817-341-4400
M-F, 8:30 am to 5:30 pm
930 Hilltop Dr, Suite 100
Weatherford, TX 76086

817-341-4400
M-F, 8:30 am to 5:30 pm
930 Hilltop Dr, Suite 100
Weatherford, TX 76086

Not texting is a great start, but there's more to safe driving

Here's the bad news: Distracted driving causes thousands of accidents every year, many of them fatal. The good news? If you're driving, it's 100% preventable.

You've seen them around your city or town. You may know a few of them.

And you might even be one yourself.

Distracted drivers come in all shapes and sizes, all makes and models. And even if you're not one today, you could become one at any moment—in the time it takes you to answer your phone, or check the kids in the back seat.

But before you say, "I can talk on my phone and drive just fine," think about this: According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and U.S. Department of Transportation, in 2016 nearly 400,000 people were injured in crashes caused by distracted drivers—and in 2015, more than 3,400 were killed.

It's not just about texting, either. Although that is perhaps the most dangerous distraction, there are many others that can impact how you drive, whether you realize it or not. And they can be just as deadly.

Here are just a few of the things that can distract drivers on the road:

  • Talking on the phone, even with a hands-free device
  • Eating or drinking
  • Talking to passengers
  • Grooming (yes, there really are people who apply makeup or shave on their way to work)
  • Reading, including maps
  • Adjusting the stereo

Younger drivers are the most distracted of all—according to the NHTSA, teens were the largest age group reported as distracted at the time of fatal crashes.

With distractions more prevalent than ever—nearly 800 billion text messages are sent in the U.S. every month, for example—how can you, and those you love, be safer behind the wheel? Here are a few tips:

  • Don't use the phone: This includes texting as well as talking, unless it's an emergency. Even hands-free conversations can take your attention off the road.
  • Eat before you leave, or after you get there: Scarfing down that burger with one hand on the wheel means your focus is divided—and you probably don't have as much control over your car as you should. Bonus benefit: Keeping your meals and your driving separate means you're much less likely to get ketchup on your pants.
  • Know where you're going: Nobody likes to be lost. But messing around with your car's GPS (or the maps app on your smartphone) while you're moving can lead to something you'll hate even more—an accident.
  • Talk to your family about safe driving: Having a conversation with your spouse as they're driving home? That's a perfect opportunity to say, "I'll let you focus on the road; we can talk when you get here." And if you have young drivers in the household, be sure to have a conversation about their phones and other potential issues, such as their passengers—a key distraction for teens.
  • Watch for other distracted drivers: Just because you aren't distracted doesn't mean that other drivers are focused on safe driving. Stay in control and be vigilant—you'll be ready to react when someone else makes the wrong move.

Distracted driving isn't just "one of those things" that happens, like a tire blowout or mechanical failure that isn't anyone's fault. It's 100% preventable—and by committing to avoiding distractions while you drive, you'll help make the road safer for everyone.

Med Pay? PIP? Dec pages? Insurance terms, explained:

With all kinds of different coverages for all kinds of different needs, insurance can be very confusing. And to make it even more challenging, at times it probably seems like insurance websites and policy documents are written in a completely foreign language.

Of course, that's why we recommend working with an independent agent—someone who is on your side during the process and who can explain everything you need to know.

Even if you do work with an independent agent, however, it's good to have a little basic knowledge about insurance. Below are definitions for some common terms that will help you understand your coverage a little better.

General Insurance Terms:

  • Actual cash value: This type of coverage pays according to what an item was worth at the time it was damaged—it takes depreciation and wear and tear into account. For example, if you could have sold your couch for about $200 just before it was damaged, that's the actual cash value, even if a similar new couch would cost $1,000.
  • Actual replacement cost: This pays the amount it would cost to replace a damaged item with a new one (such as the $1,000 couch above). It does not factor in depreciation or wear and tear.
  • Adjuster: A person who works for an insurance company to evaluate losses and settle claims.
  • Additional insured: Someone who is not the policyholder, but is still covered by an insurance policy.
  • Declarations page: This is what creates a contract between you and the insurance company. It describes who owns the policy, what property is covered and for how much, etc.
  • Deductible: The amount you agree to pay out of pocket before your insurance coverage kicks in. For example, if the cost to fix your car is $2,000, but your deductible is $1,000, you would pay $1,000 of the total cost. Typically, a higher deductible means a lower premium.
  • Endorsement: This is a change to your insurance policy's coverage, usually made through a special form.
  • Exclusion: Something specifically listed in your policy that is not covered by the policy.
  • Liability: Your responsibility for injuries or damage to other people or property. You purchase insurance to protect against liability and other risks.
  • Loss of use: When damage from an accident or other cause prevents someone from being able to live in their home or drive their car.
  • Med Pay (medical payments): This pays for medical expenses for those covered by your policy in the event of an auto accident, regardless of fault. It also covers medical expenses for guests if they are injured on your property, but unless it is a car accident, it usually does not cover injuries someone suffers on their own property.
  • Premium: The amount you pay for an insurance policy.
  • Subrogation: When an insurance company pays a claim, and then seeks damages from a third party who was responsible for causing the damage or loss. For example, your insurance company might pay for your car to be fixed even though an accident wasn't your fault—and then pursue reimbursement from the person who was at fault.
  • Term: The period of time your insurance policy is in effect, usually six or 12 months.
  • Umbrella: A policy that provides additional liability coverage. It kicks in after your other insurance policies have reached their coverage limits.
  • Underwriting: The evaluation process insurance companies use to determine if they will provide coverage to a customer.

Auto Insurance Terms:

  • Aftermarket parts: Vehicle parts made by a different company than the one that manufactured those originally included with the vehicle.
  • Bodily injury coverage: Covers expenses for physical injuries, such as hospital bills or medical care.
  • Collision coverage: This pays for damage to a vehicle caused by you or someone else covered by your policy.
  • Comprehensive coverage: If your vehicle is damaged by something you could not control, such as fire or a tree falling, comprehensive coverage applies.
  • PIP (personal injury protection): This pays medical expenses for a policyholder or additional insured, and their passengers, if they are hurt in an auto accident, regardless of fault.
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist (UIM): Pays for your damages and expenses if another driver is at fault in an accident but does not have enough insurance to cover your costs.

Homeowners Insurance Terms:

  • Additional living expenses: Coverage for expenses above your usual living expenses, such as if you have to stay in a hotel because you can’t live in your damaged home.
  • Catastrophe: A disaster, such as a hurricane or tornado, that impacts a specific area and results in significant damage.
  • Flood insurance: Typically, standard homeowners policies do not provide coverage for flooding—it must be purchased separately.
  • Home contents: These are the things inside your house that aren't fixed to the structure, such as your furniture, appliances, etc.
  • Peril: A specifically defined risk, such as hail, flooding, wind, etc.
  • Scheduled personal property: Separate coverage for high-value items, such as expensive jewelry, that exceed the limits of your policy or are otherwise excluded.

If something isn't clear when you're buying or considering insurance, don't be afraid to ask questions! Your independent agent is there to help you get the coverage you need—and make sure you understand it, too.

Were you one of the lucky ones that got a new piece of jewelry for Christmas? This new gem can bring some sparkle into your life and you want to make sure to always keep it that way!

You want to ensure that in an event of a burglary, or worse a fire or other disaster that you have enough insurance to replace your jewelry.

Here is how it works: Homeowners policies typically only cover valuable items such as jewelry and watches up to a specific amount. For example, if your limit is $5,000, but you have a $15,000 diamond ring, you'd be on the hook for an extra $10,000 in order to replace it. There might be other issues as well, such as whether your policy covers each individual piece of jewelry at a set amount, or provides coverage for your collection as a whole.

This all might sound complicated, but it's really not—especially when you work with an independent agent who can explain your options and make sure you get the right coverage. No matter how you buy your insurance, though, below are a few things you'll want to consider.

  1. Do you need more coverage? Look at your policy language, or ask your agent to explain your coverage. Do you have one or two expensive pieces, or a number of smaller items that when added together exceed your limits? You probably need to purchase additional protection.
  2. What kind of coverage should you get? This depends on your lifestyle. You may want to consider whether items are covered no matter where they are (such as if you travel internationally). You'll also want to ask about actual cash value versus replacement value, and if you would be required to actually replace the jewelry in the event of a loss or if you could just keep the cash payment.
  3. Do you need an appraisal? In some instances, an insurance company will require you to get a piece appraised to determine its value.
  4. Do you have items with mainly sentimental value, or ones that are irreplaceable? If so, you might not need to purchase any additional insurance at all. But we recommend talking to your agent before making that decision.
  5. Do you have the ability to increase your deductible? Usually, a higher deductible means a lower premium—so that's an option to potentially offset part or all of the cost of increased coverage for your jewelry.
  6. Do you have pictures? This doesn't necessarily have to do with your insurance, but jewelers often are able to recreate lost or stolen pieces with the help of a photo.

Whatever you choose to do, remember that you play an important role in keeping your jewelry protected, too: Be sure to store it securely, whether in a safe at home or a safe-deposit box at a different location. After all, having the right coverage is great—but it's even better when those special pieces stay with you and your family for years to come.

The holiday season is a time of celebration, not catastrophe.  Do not let a fire ruin your festivities. Stay safe with these top tips:

1. Make sure all decorative lights are set-up and functioning properly.  Remember to unplug and turn off your lights when you are away from home. 

2. Keep your tree away from a fireplace or burning candles.  Pick a clear place in your home to set-up the tree.

3. Dispose of your tree properly and safely.  Christmas trees are extremely flammable when dry.

4. Do not leave cooking food unattended.  Always turn off the oven or gas/electric burners when you are away from home or sleeping.

5. Never leave a candle burning when you are away or asleep.  Do not place candles close to anything flammable (including papers, clothes or your Christmas tree).

6. As a precaution, have a fire safety and escape plan in place.

As much precaution as we take, sometimes disasters are unavoidable and you want to make for certain that you are equipped to handle any scenario if necessary.

Here are also a few home insurance tips:

1. Review and understand your insurance coverage.

2. Insure valuable gifts.  Valuable gifts like diamond jewelry and antiques might not be covered under a standard homeowners or renters insurance policy.  You must purchase an "endorsement" or separate coverage for these items.

3. Conduct a holiday home inventory.  Make sure to note all valuables.

4. Keep all gift receipts.  In the case of a fire or theft this might be your only proof of ownership.

Paschall Insurance Group wants to "INSURE" you have a very Safe and Happy Holiday Season!

 

Even though we are still in the fall season, the winter temperatures we have been experiencing are telling us otherwise.  If you haven't yet winterized your home, now is the time.  Click here to follow the checklist that will give you an overview of winterizing various systems of your home.  From plumbing to the roof, it will walk you through each system and hit the major things to take care of before winter, so you can enjoy whatever the season brings and not worry about your home.